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Wire Fraud

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Wire fraud is a serious criminal offense that uses electronic or interstate communications methods to defraud someone out of money or property. It's a broad category encompassing various forms of deceit and scams conducted over phone lines, the internet, or other forms of electronic communication.

Wire fraud hinges on the intent to defraud and the use of electronic communications. It can be a standalone charge or linked with other criminal activities like identity theft or phishing schemes. Given its nature, wire fraud is often complex and can span across state and even international borders.

How does wire fraud work?

The process typically involves the perpetrator sending false statements or deceptive information electronically to trick victims into sending money or revealing sensitive information. These schemes can vary significantly in their complexity and the methods used. Common examples include:

  • Email Phishing: Sending emails that appear to be from legitimate sources, asking for personal or financial information.
  • Advance Fee Fraud: Convincing someone to pay a fee upfront for a service or reward that never materializes.
  • Business Email Compromise: Hacking or spoofing a business email account to instruct employees to transfer funds or sensitive information.
  • Online Auction and Retail Scams: Posting fake listings for products or services online, collecting payment without delivering the promised goods.


Wire fraud is a federal crime in the United States, carrying severe penalties, including hefty fines and significant prison time, especially if the fraud leads to substantial financial loss or affects many victims. Individual perpetrators face fines of up to $250,000 and up to 20 years in prison, while organizations may pay fines of up to $500,000. In exceptional cases, where wire fraud is related to a state of emergency declared by the president or targets a financial institution, penalties include a prison sentence of up to 30 years and monetary penalties of up to $1 million.


Similarly, the statute of limitations for wire fraud crimes is five years unless the target is a financial institution. Then, the statute of limitation is 10 years.

What does wire fraud look like in action?

In practice, wire fraud often involves a convincing story or an urgent request that seems real. For example, an email from what appears to be a trusted source, such as a bank or a well-known company, might ask someone to transfer funds to an account quickly. In reality, these are deceptive tactics to extract money or information.


A person responsible for vendor management at a company might receive an email appearing to be from a new vendor stating that their banking details have changed. The email seems legitimate and even uses the correct sender email address, but the sender is actually a fraudster. The vendor desk updates the vendor’s banking information to ensure that the next invoice is paid to the correct account. However, when the company wires the money to the updated account, it is instead sending money to a bad actor, leaving the actual vendor without payment.

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