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ACH API

ACH APIs enable companies with high transaction volumes to write software that automates payments over the ACH network. These APIs make it possible to initiate, receive and track payments at scale by eliminating manual processes.

For example, let's say you manage 1000 residential properties in California and need to collect rent from tenants each month using ACH. Every month, you would need to log into your bank portal and initiate 1000 ACH debit payments to your tenant’s bank accounts. You would need to handle payment failures due to issues like incorrect account information and insufficient funds. Also, each new payment flow you need to process, like refunding deposits for example, requires additional manual work. Running all of this manually by clicking around in your bank portal is not feasible over the long term or at scale..

But, using ACH APIs to integrate payments capabilities into your property management software is a more feasible long-term solution.

How do ACH APIs work

ACH moves more than $61 trillion annually and is one of the most common forms of payment today. You might recognize ACH once you know where to look. It's likely how you receive your paycheck, pay your electricity bill, or make an electronic money transfer to pay rent. Many banks, financial institutions, payment processors and software companies are building ACH APIs to streamline high volume ACH payments. So, what exactly is an API and why are they so useful?

APIs, or application programming interfaces, are simply a way to make two separate software programs talk to each other. Think of it as a menu — an API will have a list of commands you can execute with code. So, you can essentially order a program to accomplish a certain task. Each command corresponds to an API call which is a single instruction to write, read, modify or delete information from the system.

An ACH API does exactly that but for payment use cases. You could write code to initiate 1000 ACH debit payments at the 1st of every month with a given set of accounts. Or, you could write code to transfer $500 to your maintenance vendor after they complete a task. Using APIs, you don't have to log into your banking portal and make sure every transaction was executed successfully — the API does that work for you automatically.

How to pick the best ACH API for your business

An ACH API integrates with your bank to save you time and allow you to deal with lots of payments and complex money flows. But, not all ACH API providers are built the same. Here are some questions to keep in mind as you evaluate ACH APIs:

How many transactions can I execute?

Will the API scale if you run 100 transactions a month? What about 1,000? What if you’re processing a million transactions a month? Make sure the API you're picking is scalable and able to ramp up alongside you.

Does my bank provide ACH APIs?

Some banks provide their own ACH APIs while others partner with third parties to provide API access to ACH. Since there is no universal standard in place, each bank’s ACH API is different from the next. Some banks provide modern REST APIs that can integrate with any web service while others can only support batch file transfers that are harder to integrate.

Modern Treasury directly integrates with major US banks to provide you with a simple and straightforward ACH API you can use for multiple banks and bank accounts.

How is the developer experience?

Your developers should be able to use an ACH API easily and efficiently. Some API providers are better than others. To vet an API provider, take a look at their quickstarts, guides and examples of API requests if that documentation is available. If you have an easy time making your first payment, that's a good sign.

Should I directly integrate with a bank?

Traditionally, direct bank integrations are expensive and time consuming. You need to budget maintenance time to ensure the integration is running properly and continue to upgrade your integrations after building them. It makes more sense to focus on your core product rather than building a bank integration, only to have to repeat that process each time you add a new bank.

Will it help my finance team?

Finally, you want to make sure your ops and finance teams are on board with your choice of API. Integrating using ACH APIs will make their life easier by eliminating time-consuming manual tasks.

You should make sure the API you choose comes with a web interface that allows these teams to track and monitor payments and features to make reconciliation, controls, and payment approvals easier.

To learn more about ACH APIs, take a look at these articles:

ACH

ACH (Automated Clearing House) is a payment processing network that’s used to send money electronically between banks in the United States.

  1. 1ACH API
  2. 2What is ACH?
  3. 3What is an ACH Prenote?
  4. 4ACH Reversals
  5. 5ACH Return Codes
  6. 6ACH Payment Returns
  7. 7SEC Codes
  8. 8What is Same-Day ACH?
  9. 9ACH Notification of Change (NOC)
  10. 10FedACH
  11. 11ACH Credit
  12. 12ACH Debit